Posts Tagged With: Canon

Inspirational Photography Links #6

The first set of links is a bit like watching a video in high school…  I swear it even has the same commentator!  Someone posted three videos that Canon made to show people how their long glass is made.  Here’s the first, second and third in the series.  They might be a bit boring if you’re not a bit of a science or photo nerd.

Next to the blog of David Tejada.  I’m not sure exactly what to call it:  either “The F-Stops here” or “Annual Report Photographer”…  whatever, he has some good narratives and videos on small strobe lighting.

Number three is called PixSylated.  It’s another blog about small flash/strobe lighting and has LOADS of information.

And the last one is your cool, artsy link of the day.  I’ve linked to Simon Hogsberg before.  Remember “We’re All Gonna Die“?  This one is a project he did where he stopped random people on the street and asked them what they were thinking about at that very moment.  It’s called “The Thought Project.”  Cool.

Cheers,
-neil

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Categories: Inspirational Links, PHOTOGRAPHY | Tags: , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Techniques #6 – Off-Camera Non-TTL Flash

Once you’ve mastered the on-camera flash techniques you might want to start thinking about how to take that flash off and get really creative.  This is the good stuff.  This is the “Strobist” stuff that you’ve heard so much about.  There’s lots of information out there about choosing the right umbrella, the right softbox, making you’re own DIY grip gear, snoots, grids…bla, bla, bla, bla.

None of that is going to do you any good if you don’t know the basics.  This article is dedicated to helping you figure out those first few steps.

First Thing: Make Those Flashes go POP!

i-TTL and E-TTL:
One way is to use the relatively new i-TTL (Nikon) or E-TTL (Canon) systems.  These are pretty good systems but have their limitations.  To use them, you need an on-camera flash, even if you don’t want it to fire.  You also need all new, expensive flashes, and they have to be in the “line of sight” of your camera.   Old flashes aren’t going to work, and forget about hiding a flash behind a rock or wall.  The truth is, I don’t know a lot about these two systems because I don’t use them, I do it the old fashioned way.  But they are very interesting and may be the future of flash photography.  If you want more information look in your camera’s user’s manual or do some googles.  Maybe I’ll cover Nikon’s i-TTL in the future, but it’s really not on my radar.

Words, words and more words about multiple remote flashes after the jump…

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Categories: PHOTOGRAPHY, Techniques | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments

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